Smart Electronics LCD Module Display Monitor 1602 5V Blue

LiquidCrystal-Display blue 1602 Arduino Nano

I recently bought several “Smart Electronics LCD Module Display Monitor 1602 5V Blue” for building a wifi alarm clock. It uses the very common Hitachi HD44780 driver. To verify if they are working I followed this well described tutorial on arduino.cc and used a arduino nano for that. Removing the 10k ohms resistor, because it dimmed the LED background light way to much and after adjusting the potentiometer to about 1,64k ohms the visibility of desired output was optimal.

For the sake of documentation the:

Wiring

Code

The next step is to connect it to an esp8266 and figuring out if the new 3.3V signal strength will be enough. A possible solution would be to use the esp8266 only as a communication device.

FritzBox Python Class Fritz OS 6.30+ syncing Google Calendar

This project allows to interact with your FritzBox above the new FritzOS 6.30 to 6.60 (tested with Fritzbox 7490 and 7390) by using a self written FritzBox Python Class. It furthermore uses the Google Calendar API to enter phonecalls and online devices status into your google calendar. To use the Google Services you will need to generate your own client api credentials including a valid calendar json. For the expected format see the provided default files.

Of course the FritzBox Python Script also works stand alone, an provides following functionality:

  • read out last 400 phone calls
  • list current network devices

Of course I plan to increase that functionality:

  • add a config.json
  • implement CalDav Support for non google solutions
  • add pictures of google calendar entries
  • enable gant charts of devices (d3js?)
  • get FritzBox phone book(s)
  • sync phone books to Google Contacts
  • sync phone books to CardDav

I’ve you are interested to use or join me developing:

General Usage FritzBox python class

General Usage Google Calendar Wrapper

For phone calls:

For active devices tracking:

 

This also works for multiple FritzBoxes, here you see all phone calls of a week:

FritzBox Python Class - calendar view

FritzBox Python Class – calendar view

It’s pretty easy to add this script to a raspberry pi located in the network of the router. You’ll also can setup an vpnc connection between the box and an server or use a dynamic ip and a custom port.

3 axis 28BYJ-48 ROS controllable flash light

I have found a bit older project of mine while browsing through my photos.. on a relatively unclean desk you can see a combination of two 28BYJ-48 motors, some screws, metal parts and a flashlight. Last of them could be replaced for example by a laserpointer, simple sensor or a distance measurement device.

Originally this was created to be placed on my amosero robot as a very simple form of an robot arm. Sadly work forced me to not follow that project side track any further which is why I can’t share more than these pictures: IMG_0068 Maybe some when if time allows, I will recreate this and make it more accessible.

Octoprint - M33-Fio - Raspberry Pi - select positions on the print bed

Running M3D Micro under Raspbian with Octoprint and MD3Fio plugin

The M3D Software is windows only, which causes a lot of wasted power by running a windows machine all time. After several and some successful attempts of running this software on a virtual machine inside my Linux, I figured out a much more easy way to print from a Raspberry Pi. It’s called Octoprint, but on an armhf basis requires a bit attention. In combination with the M33-Fio Plugin its serving perfectly as a printing server for the M3D-Micro I own.

Setting up your Raspberry Pi 3

To save me and you some time in future, I share the step by step code to set up an Raspberry Pi 3 with Octoprint from scratch. (even if there is an image down-loadable from Octroprint Website)

Start using Octoprint in browser

Start your browser at 127.0.0.1:5000 (or the ip of your rasbperry) and config Octoprint further:

Happy printing! With this combination of 3-5 Watt Raspberry Pi, and a maximum 20W M3D you can run the printer 24/7 without wasting more than a light bulb amount of power 🙂

Links:

28BYI-48 stepper motor with Wifi - final setup

Controlling a 28BYI-48 stepper motor with Wifi for less than 10$ USD by using an esp2866 12-q

For low cost robots, remote controlled laser pointers, cat or fish feeding machines I found a really cheap way to move things by programmable wifi. The already handy usable 28BYJ-48 coming small motor driver i board is  available in china for about 2$. It additionally needs to be driven by a fast micro controller like the Arduino or the much more capable Raspberry Pi.  As I was experimenting with the esp2866 12-Q recently, the combination of this two useful things seemed more than obvious.  Therefore I decided to give it a try.

Unfortunately the stepper motor and its driver chip the ULN2003a need at least 5Vs to run, a voltage the esp2866 would by killed by as its maximum rating is about 3.6. in conclusion two power circuits or two power sources would be required. I tried to keep things simple by using an 5V-12V power source and step down converting it to 3.3V with an lm2655 based step down circuit. This setup allows an efficiency about 95% and avoids producing high amounts of heat as linear step down converters would have done. Overall the motor and the controllers consume 0.35 Amps at 5V therefore about 1.75 Watts.

Parts

  • 2$ 28BYJ-48 with ULN2003a motor driver
  • 2$ esp8266
  • 2$ step-down-converter
  • > 0,5$ breadboard 2.5 mm adapter for the esp8266
  • > 0,.5$  for15 cm of additional cables low diameter
  • soldering equipment and an 3.3V FTDI Adapter for flashing the esp2866

Steps to build your own:

  1. solder the esp2866 on the adapter board
  2. reverse the in1 in2 in3 in4 pins to the other side of the motor driver ULN2003a  board
  3. put the breadboard adapter on this pins starting with vcc followed by in1 to in4
  4. connect the v_out of the step down circuit with vcc of the breadboard adapter
  5. connect v_in of the step down circuit to the vcc of the motor driver board
  6. connect all GNDs together
  7. add pins on the breadboard adapter for flasingh the esp2866, GND, VCC, TX and RX
  8. flash the esp2866 with
    https://github.com/PaulPetring/esp2866-28BYJ-48-motor-control/blob/master/simple.ino
  9. test solderinng and apply between 5V an 12V connected to the motor driver board
  10. have fun 🙂

Wiring concept