Tag Archives: 28BYJ-48

3 axis 28BYJ-48 ROS controllable flash light

I have found a bit older project of mine while browsing through my photos.. on a relatively unclean desk you can see a combination of two 28BYJ-48 motors, some screws, metal parts and a flashlight. Last of them could be replaced for example by a laserpointer, simple sensor or a distance measurement device.

Originally this was created to be placed on my amosero robot as a very simple form of an robot arm. Sadly work forced me to not follow that project side track any further which is why I can’t share more than these pictures: IMG_0068 Maybe some when if time allows, I will recreate this and make it more accessible.

28BYI-48 stepper motor with Wifi - final setup

Controlling a 28BYI-48 stepper motor with Wifi for less than 10$ USD by using an esp2866 12-q

For low cost robots, remote controlled laser pointers, cat or fish feeding machines I found a really cheap way to move things by programmable wifi. The already handy usable 28BYJ-48 coming small motor driver i board is  available in china for about 2$. It additionally needs to be driven by a fast micro controller like the Arduino or the much more capable Raspberry Pi.  As I was experimenting with the esp2866 12-Q recently, the combination of this two useful things seemed more than obvious.  Therefore I decided to give it a try.

Unfortunately the stepper motor and its driver chip the ULN2003a need at least 5Vs to run, a voltage the esp2866 would by killed by as its maximum rating is about 3.6. in conclusion two power circuits or two power sources would be required. I tried to keep things simple by using an 5V-12V power source and step down converting it to 3.3V with an lm2655 based step down circuit. This setup allows an efficiency about 95% and avoids producing high amounts of heat as linear step down converters would have done. Overall the motor and the controllers consume 0.35 Amps at 5V therefore about 1.75 Watts.

Parts

  • 2$ 28BYJ-48 with ULN2003a motor driver
  • 2$ esp8266
  • 2$ step-down-converter
  • > 0,5$ breadboard 2.5 mm adapter for the esp8266
  • > 0,.5$  for15 cm of additional cables low diameter
  • soldering equipment and an 3.3V FTDI Adapter for flashing the esp2866

Steps to build your own:

  1. solder the esp2866 on the adapter board
  2. reverse the in1 in2 in3 in4 pins to the other side of the motor driver ULN2003a  board
  3. put the breadboard adapter on this pins starting with vcc followed by in1 to in4
  4. connect the v_out of the step down circuit with vcc of the breadboard adapter
  5. connect v_in of the step down circuit to the vcc of the motor driver board
  6. connect all GNDs together
  7. add pins on the breadboard adapter for flasingh the esp2866, GND, VCC, TX and RX
  8. flash the esp2866 with
    https://github.com/PaulPetring/esp2866-28BYJ-48-motor-control/blob/master/simple.ino
  9. test solderinng and apply between 5V an 12V connected to the motor driver board
  10. have fun 🙂

Wiring concept

Controlling two 28BYJ-48 Stepper Motors with Raspberry Pi

I’ve taken some code written by Stephen C Phillips and added/modified a few lines so its possible to run two motors at once, even with different directions.

run the code with the following command:

10 stands for rpm (rounds per minute) and +90 -90 as the amount of degrees each motor should turn. I figured out that, with this code and motors the max RPM is around 16, which results in a speed of 16 * 2 * Pi * Radius of your Wheel in cm / m.

This code only demonstrates how to turn the motors with a certain speed and degree. Its not made for rotating wheels yet..

Have fun experimenting 🙂

Controlling a stepper motor 28BYJ-48 with a Raspberry Pi

Actually there is no need to explain more about stepper motors than that video does:

Currently I am using this python code to get the motors running:

it is based on code by matt.hawkins but with some improvements I did.

Please be sure you set your GPIOs accordingly to your [amazon &title=Raspberry Pi&text=Raspberry Pi] Revision. So mine was REV 2.0.

Run the code with

and hit [Ctrl]+[C] to stop it. All pins will be set to low afterwards.

In case you want control two motors of this type see another post I made here.

 

For a different version see:
http://www.intorobotics.com/control-stepper-motors-raspberry-pi-tutorials-resources/http://www.elektronx.de/tutorials/schrittmotorsteuerung-mit-dem-raspberry-pi/ 

Raspberry Pi Robot #0

I am trying to build my own [amazon &title=Raspberry Pi&text=Raspberry Pi] based robot. Someday, it shall be able to drive autonomously based on data from its [amazon &title=Asus Xtion&text=Asus Xtion] (a smaller version of an Xbox Kinect) and with the help of ROS (Robot Operating System). For today, it is only capable of driving straight forward.

PiRosBot #Zero

Parts:

  • [amazon &title=Asus Xtion&text=Asus Xtion] Pro
  • a [amazon &title=Raspberry Pi&text=Raspberry Pi] Model B Rev.2.0
  • WLAN USB stick
  • two Stepper Motors 28BYJ-48 Datasheet PDF 5V controlled by an ULN2003A Chip
  • an easyAcc Powerbank with 10.000mhA with an MicroUSB Cable supplying 2A of power
  • some metal toy constuction set parts including 3 wheels
  • 8 old female to female jumper wires
  • 2 Y female jumper whires (to share positive and ground of the raspberry with the motors)

With this setup, the raspberry i able to run at least 8 hours by the power of my already a little bit aged powerbank. Driving at an unbelievable slow speed of about 30 seconds per meter (full torque mode of steppers).

For documentation (and for fun, because I never did this before), here a small video of the very first test drive: